Steroids for rheumatoid arthritis side effects

Prednisone is a drug that belongs to the corticosteroid drug class, and is an anti-inflammatory and immune system suppressant. It's used to treat a variety of diseases and conditions, for example: inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), lupus, asthma, cancers, and several types of arthritis.

Common side effects are weight gain, headache, fluid retention, and muscle weakness. Other effects and adverse events include glaucoma, cataracts, obesity, facial hair growth, moon face, and growth retardation in children. This medicine also causes psychiatric problems, for example: depression, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and psychotic behavior. Serious side effects include reactions to diabetes drugs, infections, and necrosis of the hips and joints.

Corticosteroids like prednisone, have many drug interactions; examples include: estrogens, phenytoin (Dilantin), diuretics, warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), and diabetes drugs. Prednisone is available as tablets of 1, , 10, 20, and 50 mg; extended release tablets of 1, 2, and 5mg; and oral solution of 5mg/5ml. It's use during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. This medicine is secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in infants who are nursing. You should not stop taking prednisone abruptly because it can cause withdrawal symptoms and adrenal failure. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about beta-blockers. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about prednisone.

If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

One of the most important balancing acts you will need to achieve is the balance between rest and exercise. We have known for centuries that resting inflamed joints makes them more comfortable. However, the joints and muscles are parts of the locomotor system, the parts of the body which are involved in movement. Without movement your joints will stiffen and your muscles will waste away. So what should you do? The most important thing is to use your muscles and joints as much as possible without harming them. This helps retain movement and stops muscles wasting away. We also know that exercise is a good thing in general, and that exercise helps you feel better.

Pulse therapy involves taking high doses of glucocorticoids over a short period of time. This approach is typically used to treat acute flares, as well as a “bridge” therapy until DMARD treatment reaches full effect. Typically, pulse therapy is given as a high-dose IV infusion, for instance IV methylprednisolone 1000 mg daily for 3 consecutive days once per month. Lower doses may also be used. Although, IV infusion is the preferred route of administration for pulse therapy, steroids may also be given orally or by intramuscular injection. Patients who receive steroid pulse therapy alone may have a response that lasts 6 to 8 weeks. If given in combination with DMARD treatment, responses can last much longer. 1

When a patient with rheumatoid arthritis develops cervical instability and/or spinal stenosis with myelopathy, surgical intervention is considered. The goal of surgery is to stabilize the spine and remove the compression from the spinal cord, to improve a patient's pain and level of function, as well as prevent further deterioration of function and worsening pain. A patient with isolated cranial settling and/or atlanto-axial instability without cord compression can be treated with posterior (back of the neck) occipital-cervical fusion with instrumentation. However, patients with severe anterior (front of the neck) cord compression from a pannus at the C1-C2 joint will be indicated for a transoral decompression surgery combined with a posterior occipital-cervical fusion with instrumentation. Patients with subaxial subluxation may have instability or stenosis, or both. Treatment options vary depending on each patient's clinical and radiopgraphic presentation. Patients with subaxial instability may only require a spinal fusion. Patients with stenosis and myelopathy require surgical decompression, and often fusion as well. If the majority of pressure is coming from osteophytes in the front (anterior) of the spine, then an anterior corpectomy with strut graft and fusion may be considered. If the majority of the compression is occurring due to ligamentum flavum hypertrophy in the back part of the spinal cord, then a laminectomy or laminaplasty may be performed. Occasionally, patients with severe, multiple level stenosis and instability will require both front (anterior) and back (posterior) of the neck surgery to adequately decompress and stabilize the spine. Generally, a cervical spinal fusion will always be required and recommended in addition to the decompression component. Spinal instrumentation will typically be utilized to impart immediate stability and increase the fusion (bone healing and mending together) rate. There is a higher rate of improvement for rheumatoid patients with cervical instability and/or neurologic dysfunction treated surgically than those treated nonsurgically. However, careful preoperative evaluation and delicate perioperative and postoperative management is particularly important to ensure success and avoid complications.

Steroids for rheumatoid arthritis side effects

steroids for rheumatoid arthritis side effects

When a patient with rheumatoid arthritis develops cervical instability and/or spinal stenosis with myelopathy, surgical intervention is considered. The goal of surgery is to stabilize the spine and remove the compression from the spinal cord, to improve a patient's pain and level of function, as well as prevent further deterioration of function and worsening pain. A patient with isolated cranial settling and/or atlanto-axial instability without cord compression can be treated with posterior (back of the neck) occipital-cervical fusion with instrumentation. However, patients with severe anterior (front of the neck) cord compression from a pannus at the C1-C2 joint will be indicated for a transoral decompression surgery combined with a posterior occipital-cervical fusion with instrumentation. Patients with subaxial subluxation may have instability or stenosis, or both. Treatment options vary depending on each patient's clinical and radiopgraphic presentation. Patients with subaxial instability may only require a spinal fusion. Patients with stenosis and myelopathy require surgical decompression, and often fusion as well. If the majority of pressure is coming from osteophytes in the front (anterior) of the spine, then an anterior corpectomy with strut graft and fusion may be considered. If the majority of the compression is occurring due to ligamentum flavum hypertrophy in the back part of the spinal cord, then a laminectomy or laminaplasty may be performed. Occasionally, patients with severe, multiple level stenosis and instability will require both front (anterior) and back (posterior) of the neck surgery to adequately decompress and stabilize the spine. Generally, a cervical spinal fusion will always be required and recommended in addition to the decompression component. Spinal instrumentation will typically be utilized to impart immediate stability and increase the fusion (bone healing and mending together) rate. There is a higher rate of improvement for rheumatoid patients with cervical instability and/or neurologic dysfunction treated surgically than those treated nonsurgically. However, careful preoperative evaluation and delicate perioperative and postoperative management is particularly important to ensure success and avoid complications.

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