East german guns

Were the rules far too stringent? My hunting enthusiast brother-in-law never complained to me about restrictions on his hunting rights (whose rules now no longer apply). He was, by the way, a teacher, who never dreamed of having a gun in a classroom. And his death, before he was 65, was not due to any hunting or weapons’ mishap but rather, almost conclusively, to his addiction to cigarettes, whose use was completely uncontrolled. Being no hunter, sport shooter or smoker, and no longer in a school, I can reserve judgement in these matters.

The story of how the broomhandle ended up in Vietnam is quite varied. The czarist Russian army had used some, which were then inherited by the Soviet Union; which itself made a sizable buy of this gun in 1920-1921; designated M1920. Further examples were captured from Poland during the joint German/Soviet invasion in 1939. As a non-standard weapon by the 1940s, some of these were transferred to reserve warehouses in the Soviet Far East. The USSR’s participation in the war against Japan lasted only days and was entirely offensive, so the defensive emergency guns were never needed. The July 1953 armistice which ended the Korean War allowed the USSR to undertake an emergency rebuilding of the North Korean army, during which the now long-obsolete Mausers were dumped off to North Korea. The North Koreans did not want them either, and sent some to North Vietnam in the 1960s as a way of indirectly harming the USA.

Although this is a very interesting invention, it was never very popular and most likely only very few Eyring guns were produced. The guns that came to our attention were mostly side-by-side double rifles and one three barrel gun, mostly with the heaviest rifle calibers that were available at the time. The inventions of stronger bolting systems was driven by the new smokeless powders that developed much higher pressures, and gun makers competed by claiming that they had the strongest actions. The Eyring patent was granted in 1908 and the Jaeger Vertikal Block Verschluss , better described as a tilting block action, already in 1906. Both were considered very strong actions but both were very costly to make. The Jaeger invention does not depart from the traditional appearance of hunting guns, while the Eyring, when opened, looks so very different. Tradition always played a major role when choosing a gun and still does for the gun collector.

The Makarov was first made in Russia where its designer Nikolai Federovich Makarov is from. They were also made in East Germany, China (is there anything that China has not copied?), Bulgaria and Germany (after the wall came down). There are multiple versions of the Russians guns. There have been imported from Russia surplus guns as well as guns marked "Baikal" and "Ishmech". All of the double stack Makarov's were made in Russia. The East German guns are the finest of all the Makarov pistols made. Most Makarov's are a little crude as far as the fit and finish goes. Not the East German version. They are as smooth as any German gun I have ever handled and the polish job is almost as good as a prewar commercial Colt. The Bulgarian guns have pretty much the same fit and finish of the Russian guns. They shoot as well as the Russian and East German guns. The German guns made after the wall came down don't have quite the finish as the old East German guns but function perfectly. The Chinese guns have the quality of a Norinco firearm. Most of you have experience with Norinco guns and know their great quality....

East german guns

east german guns

The Makarov was first made in Russia where its designer Nikolai Federovich Makarov is from. They were also made in East Germany, China (is there anything that China has not copied?), Bulgaria and Germany (after the wall came down). There are multiple versions of the Russians guns. There have been imported from Russia surplus guns as well as guns marked "Baikal" and "Ishmech". All of the double stack Makarov's were made in Russia. The East German guns are the finest of all the Makarov pistols made. Most Makarov's are a little crude as far as the fit and finish goes. Not the East German version. They are as smooth as any German gun I have ever handled and the polish job is almost as good as a prewar commercial Colt. The Bulgarian guns have pretty much the same fit and finish of the Russian guns. They shoot as well as the Russian and East German guns. The German guns made after the wall came down don't have quite the finish as the old East German guns but function perfectly. The Chinese guns have the quality of a Norinco firearm. Most of you have experience with Norinco guns and know their great quality....

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