East german doping scandal

Athletes may obtain banned medicines from physicians, pharmacists, retail outlets, health and lifestyle magazines, gymnasiums, coaches, family members, fellow athletes, the internet and the black market. Many GPs may prescribe unwittingly for what they trust is a genuine , 14 & 16 With the banning of amphetamine, those prone to doping turned to over-the-counter (OTC) medicines containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine and phenylpropanolamine, available for purchase in community pharmacies. Banned drugs, including anabolic steroids, are widely advertised in lifestyle magazines and gymnasiums and there are no controls on mail order and internet sales.

In November 1942, the Italian cyclist Fausto Coppi took "seven packets of amphetamine" to beat the world hour record on the track. [28] In 1960, the Danish rider Knud Enemark Jensen collapsed during the 100 km team time trial at the Olympic Games in Rome and died later in hospital. The autopsy showed he had taken amphetamine and another drug, Ronicol , which dilates the blood vessels. The chairman of the Dutch cycling federation, Piet van Dijk, said of Rome that "dope – whole cartloads – [were] used in such royal quantities." [29]

East german doping scandal

east german doping scandal

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