Books on east german doping

    After the Berlin wall came down, the victims of the DDR regime demanded immediate retribution. Ironically, their demands were countered by their fellow Germans in the West who, living in freedom, had diligently built einen demokratischen Rechtsstaat , a democratic state governed by the rule of law. The challenge of protecting the rights of both the victims and the accused was immense, given the emotions surrounding the issue. Government leaders and democratic politicians recognized that there could be no "quick fix" of communist injustices without jeopardizing the entire system of democratic jurisprudence. Moving too rapidly merely to satisfy the popular thirst for revenge might well have resulted in acquittals or mistrials. Intricate jurisdictional questions needed to be resolved with both alacrity and meticulousness. No German government could afford to allow a perpetrator to go free because of a judicial error. The political fallout from any such occurrence, especially in the East, could prove fatal to whatever political party occupied the chancellor's office in Bonn at the time.

Many Germans have begun to modify their eating habits to lower their calorie and cholesterol intake. Since the unification of East and West Germany in the 1990s, the government has faced the challenge of bringing the living conditions in the former East Germany up to the standard found in the former West Germany. Upgrading housing, schools, and utilities will continue after 2001. Despite unequal living conditions, Germans in all parts of the country are well nourished. In fact, most German children have enough to eat.

Here is where German intellectuals come into the story. Journalists and academics have had a hard time understanding why the Pegida movement emerged when it did and why it has attracted so many people in Germany; there are branches of the Pegida movement in other parts of Europe, but they have gathered only marginal support thus far. Those who suggest it is driven by “anger” and “resentment” are being descriptive at best. What is remarkable, though, is that “rage” as a political stance has received the philosophical blessing of the leading AfD intellectual, Marc Jongen, who is a former assistant of the well-known philosopher Peter Sloterdijk. Jongen has not only warned about the danger of Germany’s “cultural self-annihilation”; he has also argued that, because of the cold war and the security umbrella provided by the US, Germans have been forgetful about the importance of the military, the police, warrior virtues—and, more generally, what the ancient Greeks called thymos (variously translated as spiritedness, pride, righteous indignation, a sense of what is one’s own, or rage), in contrast to eros and logos , love and reason. Germany, Jongen says, is currently “undersupplied” with thymos . Only the Japanese have even less of it—presumably because they also lived through postwar pacifism. According to Jongen, Japan can afford such a shortage, because its inhabitants are not confronted with the “strong natures” of immigrants. It follows that the angry demonstrators are doing a damn good thing by helping to fire up thymos in German society.

Depends on which one article would you like to have translated – the 450 pages Ian refers to is a (! – one wonders what was in previous three…) of the materials from a scientific historical conference held at St Petersburg Museum in 2014, and there are several individual articles, on fortification, uniforms, guns etc. First of all, the 25 MB dowloads forever – it’s now 15 minutes since I started to suck it in, and there’s still at least 25% left to go… When it downloads I’ll have a look and post the contents list. Perhaps one of our Russian posters could make a translation, or we can delineate some kind of a “gang-bang” job (many translators, each translating 4-5 pages) – but it would still take some time. When we’re finished, each translator would send his/her/its part to Ian for integration and posting. I’m not sure though about the copyright: publishing a translated material without some kind of an agreement with the author would infringe his copyright, wouldn’t it?

Books on east german doping

books on east german doping

Depends on which one article would you like to have translated – the 450 pages Ian refers to is a (! – one wonders what was in previous three…) of the materials from a scientific historical conference held at St Petersburg Museum in 2014, and there are several individual articles, on fortification, uniforms, guns etc. First of all, the 25 MB dowloads forever – it’s now 15 minutes since I started to suck it in, and there’s still at least 25% left to go… When it downloads I’ll have a look and post the contents list. Perhaps one of our Russian posters could make a translation, or we can delineate some kind of a “gang-bang” job (many translators, each translating 4-5 pages) – but it would still take some time. When we’re finished, each translator would send his/her/its part to Ian for integration and posting. I’m not sure though about the copyright: publishing a translated material without some kind of an agreement with the author would infringe his copyright, wouldn’t it?

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